Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

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When we imagine the scenery, there is always a big view or a magnificent mountain range. But what is urban landscape? Cities are as noticeable as nature, at least in terms of vitality. The city not only has the change of sunshine and season, but also the continuous stream of people accompanied by noise.

Viewing Cities from a Middle Distance Perspective

Usually we stand in a crowded building and observe the city from the street level. It feels constrained and dark. To bring life to a city, sometimes photographers need to find a medium-distance angle to give people a sense of intimacy. The incredible part of the day is the time before sunset and moonrise. The outline of the city is still visible, and the buildings in between are also shining with lights. Without looking down, a moderate distance is still close enough to feel the city. There are public restaurants and bars that can be accessed in any city. They give you a glimpse into the city. Google Maps is very helpful in finding such places. Before you travel to a city, it's better to spend some time on it. It can give you such a medium-distance perspective. This photo was taken at the James Hotel in lower Manhattan. Wide-angle lenses give the work and the city a sense of space.

Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

Urban Landscape, Manhattan & nbsp; Photography: National Geographic Creation

Photo detail camera: Canon 5D Mark III lens: EF 16-35mm 2.8 II at 23mm shutter speed: 1/6 second aperture: f/4.0 ISO: 100

Go a little further.

Sometimes it's best to keep a certain distance from the skyline if you want to see it really. The Stanton Island Ferry is some distance away from New York City, but beyond the point of view that can be photographed. This photo combines the city skyline, ferry workers and long-distance ships to create a "coming and going" city scene. Photographs are taken with a 50mm "normal" lens, usually with the photographer away from the lens. With this lens, the photographer must pay attention to where he is when shooting.Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

Manhattan Skyline, Staton Island & nbsp; Photography: National Geographic Creation Photo Details: Camera: Canon 5D Mark III lens: EF 50mm f/1.2 shutter speed: 1/400 second aperture: f/5.6ISO: 125

Not all the scenes happened outside.

Urban landscapes can also appear inside buildings, and few are more photographic than New York Central Station. This is the most dynamic place in the city, and one of the challenges of photography is to give it a sense of motion. If you want to take the sense of busyness into the film, you can use the long shutter speed (this work is 1 second) to insert the illusion of activity into the whole picture. In this photo, the man in white stood alone and quietly, with vivid details. He is the "Needle of Ding Hai Shen" in this work.

Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

Central Station & nbsp; Photography: National Geographic Creation

Photo details: camera: Canon 5D Mark III & nbsp; lens: EF 16-35mm 2.8 II at 35mm & nbsp; shutter speed: 1 second aperture: f/10

Focus on the blending of human and landscape

In places like Central Park, people, scenery and urban scenery can be well integrated. The park is spacious enough for you to see the skyline of New York and the wonderful people around it. Characters are usually vivid elements in landscape photographs, and they give focus to the work.Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

Flying kites, Central Park & nbsp; Photography: National Geographic Creation Photo Details: Camera: Canon 5D Mark III lens: EF 16-35mm 2.8 II at 26mm shutter speed: 1/2000 second aperture: f/5.6 & nbsp; ISO: 200

Waiting for the right combination of elements

Times Square must make headlines when you look for the right place to shoot. It's the end of most tourists'journeys and one of the most photographed places in the world. How can you make a difference? In this photo, the photographer, street artist JR, and his work "Project Inside and Outside". JR and some volunteers graffiti portraits of ordinary people on Times Square. These portraits and the overwhelming advertisements make up the work.Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

Street Art, Times Square & nbsp; Photography: National Geographic Creation

Photo details: camera: Canon 5D Mark III & nbsp; lens: EF 16-35mm 2.8 II at 16mm & nbsp; shutter speed: 1/160 seconds & nbsp; aperture: f/4.0 & nbsp; ISO: 400

Look down

Sometimes the picture is right under you. This picture was taken through New York's High Line Park on the street below. The photographer was waiting for a yellow taxi to cross below. The taxi made this picture. It lets you know where you are without shooting the skyline of the city. Strong light makes contrast strong, and shooting under these conditions is a challenge. However, this photo was successful. The yellow taxi contrasts strongly with the black shadow.

Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

Yellow Taxi, High Line Photography: National Geographic Creation Photo Details: Camera: Canon 5D Mark III lens: EF 16-35mm 2.8 II at 35mm shutter speed: 1/800 seconds & nbsp; aperture: f/7.1 & nbsp; ISO: 200

Fixed Camera in Low Light Mode

Even if photographers were allowed to carry tripods to the 86th floor of the Empire State Building, which was crowded, using tripods was unlikely. Imagine the most congested Lane on Earth, and the night on Fifth Avenue is as you think. The photographer had to squeeze out some places, get some scenery, and then squeeze out. When the sun sets and the city begins to become lively, how to keep the scene in the picture becomes a problem. This generation of SLR cameras have excellent performance under high ISO. Fixing the camera on the guardrail can give a good answer with surprisingly slow shutter speed.Teach you how to shoot City Scenery

 


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