Street photography takes "decisive moments" at 4:00

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The word "decisive moment" has almost become synonymous with Bresson. The decisive moment is that everything has a fraction of a second, plus the photographer's observation, while pressing the shutter, all the elements present the most "harmonious" or "most descriptive of the situation" state. "When the composition of a picture (landscape, statically) is integrated with the movements of the object (inner and dynamic) into the best moment to tell, it is also the best moment to reveal the essence of the disposition of the scene, which is the decisive moment." —— In fact, Bresson's sentence came from a sentence written by Cardinal De Rets in the seventeenth century: "Everything in the world has its decisive moment." Similar concepts are somewhat like "Everything is timed" or "It's not time not yet"... It means... And so on... You know...

When you first see this word in street photography, you will associate it with those "fleeting" moments, such as the photo that Bresson is generally acknowledged to be the most capable of presenting "decisive moment" (a man in a hat jumping over a puddle) & nbsp;

Street photography takes

It has always been thought that decisive moments depend on "luck", "rapid response speed" and "a high degree of familiarity with camera functions" to capture those moments that will disappear in a fraction of a second, but I misunderstood that many people, like me, have misunderstood the meaning of "decisive moments". If you look again at Bishop Retz's words: "Everything in the world has its own decisive moment", you will know why it is not just luck, not just those moments of rapid change, but also those "static" people and things have their own "decisive moment", but also know how to observe and be right. Time press the shutter. There are some skills in shooting "decisive moments". We all think that Bresson has good luck, fast speed and can always shoot some rare moments, but besides luck, there are also some skills. Let's see what techniques you can use to capture "decisive moments".

1. Feel the rhythm of the street

Street photography is like ballroom dancing. The ballroom dancing between the photographer and the street. People and things on the street have their rhythm, such as bus stops and stops, traffic lights changing, escalators rolling in subway stations, automatic doors opening and closing in convenience stores, passers-by taking the first step at the green light, starting to run or run with 10 seconds left, and so on. Many people feel that street photographers must speed up. Quick, fast eyes, fast shutter, fast movement, yes, speed can really make you catch great moments, but before talking about speed, you have to slow down and feel the rhythm of the street, as mentioned earlier in the social dance, as long as a person's pace is wrong, he will step on his partner's foot or fall, the whole rhythm is chaotic. Street photography is the same. If you don't try to feel the rhythm of the street and just keep busy walking, you will lose a lot of opportunities to see wonderful moments. Go to a street corner and stand around for a while and you will probably feel the meaning of "street rhythm".

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

2. Observation and prediction

When to press the shutter should be a question many people have about street photography, "How do you know someone will pass by at that time?" "How do you know what that person's next move is?" "How did it happen?" Have you ever seen a Nicolas Cage movie, Next, in which the hero has the superpower to predict what will happen in two minutes. He will see all the possibilities in his mind and make the most favorable choice. Street photographers have this ability, not to say super-ability, but to guess the "possible" situation through careful observation. Simple imagination is that a child who has just learned to ride a bicycle may fall in the next second. A passer-by crosses the street with five cups of coffee grabbing the red light, may knock over the coffee, in the downtown area. Standing in front of an interesting poster, there may be an interesting person who, after forming a funny contrast, may step on shit the next second he looks down at his mobile phone. Wait a minute. Try to observe and practice predicting what might happen around you in a minute. Within that minute, you will have many chances to photograph the "decisive moment" you want. Street photographers need to practice their observation until they know their surroundings as well as Jason Bourne when they enter an environment.

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

3. Don't stop expecting wonderful moments.

There's a book called Secret, which says that when you keep thinking and expecting things, it's likely to come true. Of course, we can't always expect endless wonderful moments from the streets, but when you do that, the way you watch them will be different. Expect interesting pictures on a street corner. Expect great compositions around the corner. Expect great lights on the next street. When you do that, you will see great lights on the next street corner. When you do this expectation, you will gradually know how to observe, where to look, and when to press the shutter. Simply put, it's the power of the street photographer.

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

4. Waiting for the Opportunity

Many of Bresson's works seem to be very rare moments. Whether it is the composition or the characters in the picture, the light and shadow scenes and the interaction between the characters, we can only sigh at Bresson's luck and skills, but have we ever wondered why he always took so many wonderful moments? Of course, skill and luck are indispensable in street photography, but if you spread out Bresson's negatives, you can see why he often takes those wonderful moments. This technique is called "waiting".

When you see a great scene or light, wait there for a while, wait for someone to pass by, wait for a situation to happen, wait for a change of light and shadow, many people like to compare street photography to hunter. The hunter's characteristic is that they don't walk all the time, will wait in one place, and start at the right time. Street photographers also have to learn to wait, not to walk around looking for a shooting target, try to observe at a point, and use the shutter to "create" a wonderful moment at the right time.

Street photography takes

Street photography takes

The above skills, you might as well try them next time you go out to shoot.


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